By Peter Partoza
Correspondent

Disney fans have been buffeted with live-action remake and sequel after sequel of classic movies, such as “Toy Story,” “Cars,” “The Lion King,” “Beauty and the Beast,” and countless others. But with “Christopher Robin,” a nice change of pace has hit the cinema scene.  

Christopher Robin tells the story of an adult Christopher who has left the Hundred Acre Woods and has been through the rollercoaster ride of growing up. Those who grew up with “Winnie the Pooh” are pulled in, easily identifying themselves with Christopher Robin as they watch him go through schooling, falling in love, going to war, and starting a family, all within a brief montage in the opening portion of the movie.  

The movie cuts to a view of Christopher Robin, now a workaholic with a strained relationship with his family. Trouble at work adds to Christopher’s stress and begins to push him further and further away from his family, causing him to send them to his childhood cottage for the weekend as he works.

As Christopher aged and grew, Pooh eagerly awaited the return on the other side.

Coming to the movie’s present time, Pooh discovers that he can’t find his friends one day. He decides to venture through the door Christopher Robin would always come through to visit and play.

As Pooh comes through the door he enters our world and through story driving coincidence, Christopher Robin and Pooh reunite.

After realizing that the tree Pooh came through no longer has a way back to the Hundred Acre Wood, Christopher is propelled into a journey to his childhood home, all the while carrying the lighthearted Pooh with him.

As the movie goes on, Christopher Robin’s adult cynicism and stresses begin to clash with Pooh’s childlike wonder and simplicity, making it a recipe ripe for not only comedy and cartoon antics but also somber moments that bring the viewers back to the idea that they are no longer children.

As strange as this sounds, this movie was not made for children. Hear me out. Children being brought to this movie will enjoy the simple comedy that Pooh and friends bring, but the real meat of this movie is the idea of when a child such as Christopher Robin grows up.

It grips those who have already gone through that transition, playing on the heartstrings of those who miss a simpler time. If I had to say one message that this movie had, it would be that “it’s never too late to be a kid again.” “Christopher Robin” is a feel-good movie, which, if only for a short time, will bring you away from the negativity in the world and leave you feeling better than before.

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