A visitor to Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Hazy Library is sure to notice the colorful artwork that adorns the walls of the second floor.  Depicting all kinds of aviation-related themes, these works were all submitted by children ages six to seventeen as a part of the International Aviation Art Contest, a competition hosted by the Swiss based Federation Aeronautique Internationale.  Since 2009, ERAU Prescott has served as the archive for the international winners, as well as providing judges to choose pieces to move on from the state to the US national contest.  On Friday, Feb. 8, ERAU staff members judged this year’s submissions.

With such a diverse array of artwork, the job of selecting winners is certainly an interesting one.  The art may be produced with a variety of mediums, from oil pastels, watercolor, and acrylic paint, to crayons and magic markers (a popular choice with the younger age categories).  The submissions judged at ERAU represent a diverse selection of states, including Georgia, Pennsylvania, Florida, Arizona, Washington, and Utah, and the children range in age from six to seventeen years old.  Many of the pieces display a very high degree of talent, especially for such young artists.  Even those pieces that are not sent to up to the national level are a great addition to the library’s growing display.

The team of judges, made up of Barbara Martens, Steve Bobinsky, Linda Eisner, Kathy Hill, and Ray Johnson (a member of the ERAU Board of Visitors and the National Aeronautic Association Education Chairman), reviewed this year’s submissions.  The artwork was divided up by state, and then into three age categories.  “Art is in the eye of the beholder,” stated Kathy Hill, “so we’re looking for artwork that meets the subject criteria and is pleasing to the eye.”  The judges evaluated each piece for its commitment to this year’s theme of “My Favorite Air Sport,” and then chose a first, second, and third place winner for each category.  With twenty-one different submissions from many talented young artists, the judges had their work cut out for them.

After much deliberation, winners were selected in each category, and the art was sent to Washington D.C. for judging on the national level during the week of March 4.  The first, second, and third place winners in each category at the United States level will have the opportunity to visit the capital, a great experience for any young art and aviation enthusiast.  This trip is sponsored by the United States host for this contest, the National Association of State Aviation Officials.

This art contest provides a unique opportunity for kids across the globe, not only to have their artistic talents acknowledged, but also to cultivate an interest in aerospace and aviation.  When the Aviation International Art Contest began in 1986, children from 14 countries participated; today 59 countries submit artwork for judging at the international level.  The ERAU Prescott campus is proud to support this program and be the archive for children’s aviation artwork from around the globe.

Hazy Library Hosts International Art Contest

By: Sara Miles, Correspondent

A visitor to Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Hazy Library is sure to notice the colorful artwork that adorns the walls of the second floor.  Depicting all kinds of aviation-related themes, these works were all submitted by children ages six to seventeen as a part of the International Aviation Art Contest, a competition hosted by the Swiss based Federation Aeronautique Internationale.  Since 2009, ERAU Prescott has served as the archive for the international winners, as well as providing judges to choose pieces to move on from the state to the US national contest.  On Friday, Feb. 8, ERAU staff members judged this year’s submissions.

With such a diverse array of artwork, the job of selecting winners is certainly an interesting one.  The art may be produced with a variety of mediums, from oil pastels, watercolor, and acrylic paint, to crayons and magic markers (a popular choice with the younger age categories).  The submissions judged at ERAU represent a diverse selection of states, including Georgia, Pennsylvania, Florida, Arizona, Washington, and Utah, and the children range in age from six to seventeen years old.  Many of the pieces display a very high degree of talent, especially for such young artists.  Even those pieces that are not sent to up to the national level are a great addition to the library’s growing display.

The team of judges, made up of Barbara Martens, Steve Bobinsky, Linda Eisner, Kathy Hill, and Ray Johnson (a member of the ERAU Board of Visitors and the National Aeronautic Association Education Chairman), reviewed this year’s submissions.  The artwork was divided up by state, and then into three age categories.  “Art is in the eye of the beholder,” stated Kathy Hill, “so we’re looking for artwork that meets the subject criteria and is pleasing to the eye.”  The judges evaluated each piece for its commitment to this year’s theme of “My Favorite Air Sport,” and then chose a first, second, and third place winner for each category.  With twenty-one different submissions from many talented young artists, the judges had their work cut out for them.

After much deliberation, winners were selected in each category, and the art was sent to Washington D.C. for judging on the national level during the week of March 4.  The first, second, and third place winners in each category at the United States level will have the opportunity to visit the capital, a great experience for any young art and aviation enthusiast.  This trip is sponsored by the United States host for this contest, the National Association of State Aviation Officials.

This art contest provides a unique opportunity for kids across the globe, not only to have their artistic talents acknowledged, but also to cultivate an interest in aerospace and aviation.  When the Aviation International Art Contest began in 1986, children from 14 countries participated; today 59 countries submit artwork for judging at the international level.  The ERAU Prescott campus is proud to support this program and be the archive for children’s aviation artwork from around the globe.

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